Learning Resources — Publications

Do Ask, Do Tell: Talking to your provider about being LGBT

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) people routinely face stigma and barriers to health care. Do Ask, Do Tell: Talking to your health care provider about being LGBT was developed to empower LGBT patients to "come out" to health care providers.  Being open and honest about sexuality and gender identity is important for improving individual health and allowing providers to deliver culturally responsive, cost-effective, patient-centered care.  There is space on the brochure to add your organization's logo.

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Improving the Health Care of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) People: Understanding and Eliminating Health Disparities

This document offers a brief but comprehensive overview of the major issues relevant to the health and health care of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. The authors discuss LGBT demographics, terminology, and concepts; they also review LGBT health disparities across the life span. Clinicians and health care organizations will learn steps they can take to improve access to patient-centered care for their LGBT patients, including collecting data on sexual orientation and gender identity, creating a welcoming environment and providing interventions that respond to LGBT disparities.

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Addressing the Needs of LGBT People in Community Health Centers: What the Governing Board Needs to Know

The National Association of Community Health Centers and the National LGBT Health Education Center

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Promoting Cervical Cancer Screening Among Lesbians and Bisexual Women

This Fenway Institute analysis examines the heightened risk profile of lesbians and bisexual women, such as lower rates of health insurance coverage and less access to preventive health care, including routine pelvic exams. It also describes efforts in the UK and Australia to promote Pap tests among lesbians, and why it is important to offer Pap tests to some transgender men, many of whom retain a cervix and may be at risk for cervical cancer. Providers should also be trained in broader LGBT health issues, so that they are equipped to provide clinically competent care to lesbian and bisexual women and transgender men in ways that are sensitive and culturally competent.

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Emergency Preparedness and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender (LGBT) People: What Health Centers Need to Know

Health centers often serve as a key resource during a natural disaster or other public health emergency. Before an emergency strikes, it is important for health centers to consider the unique needs and circumstances of vulnerable populations, including LGBT individuals and families in the community.

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Emerging Clinical Issue: Hepatitis C Infection in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men

Approximately 3.2 million individuals in the United States are infected with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection. While injection drug use is the most common mode of transmission, growing evidence indicates that the virus is also being spread through sexual contact, particularly among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). In this clinical brief, we review what is known about the epidemiology of HCV among HIV-infected MSM, as well as current screening, treatment, and prevention recommendations for HCV.

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The Fenway Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health, 2nd Edition

American College of Physicians (ACP), 2015. Editors: Harvey Makadon, MD, Jennifer Potter, MD, Kenneth Mayer, MD and Hilary Goldhammer, MS of the Fenway Institute, Fenway Health

This new 2nd edition of The Fenway Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health reflects clinical and social changes since the publication of the first edition.

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Promoting HPV Vaccine To Prevent Genital Warts and Cancers

Human papilloma virus (HPV), one of the most common sexually transmitted infections, is preventable through a vaccine now recommended for all females and males age 11 to 26. However, vaccination rates remain low in the U.S., in part because only one-third of doctors prescribe the vaccine to eligible patients. HPV infection can lead to genital warts and certain types of cancer. This brief provides an analysis of the current state of HPV vaccination rates in the U.S., finding them lagging well behind other countries, where vaccination campaigns have been more successful. 

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